Dog In Deep Sleep, Hard to Wake Up? What to Know About Dogs Sleeping

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dog in deep sleep hard to wake up
Little puppy Beagle dog sleeping in deep.

One of the cutest things I love about my dog is watching him sleep, seeing him so calm and peaceful. Who doesn’t smile when seeing their pets sprawled out and in deep sleep, getting the much-needed rest they need? It’s not only adorable, but it helps them get rest from the tiring day and ensures good health for years to come!

But there are some issues pet owners seem to notice, such as having a dog in deep sleep, hard to wake up from their slumber. While it’s usual for dogs to have a difficult time waking up after a night of deep sleep (like us humans), there may be something else going on you’d like checked.

To help you out, read on to learn about a dog’s usual sleep pattern!

What to Know About Dog’s Sleep

Dogs actually need more sleep than us humans, and not many know that since we don’t exactly tally the accumulated amount of hours they sleep daily. They actually need about 12 to 14 hours of sleep, that’s at least half a day! However, there are several factors which impact their sleep needs, such as age, breed, size, and active life.

Also, just like us humans, they go through different stages of canine sleep, with similar brain waves as we slumber. There are actually different sleep stages they go through such as short-wave sleep and deep (REM) sleep.

What makes dogs different compared to humans however, is how long it takes for us to enter deep sleep. The cycle is faster in dogs, with them reaching deep sleep in under 20 minutes on average. You’ll know they are in deep sleep when you notice muscle or eye twitching involuntary, as well as small noises.

How Much Sleep Do Dogs Need
Source: www.petwave.com

Furthermore, the sleep cycle is much shorter, with dogs not requiring the long uninterrupted sleep we do. It’s why they sleep on and off throughout the day with a similar burst of energy!

With all that being said, how will you know when they sleep too much and when deep sleep can become an issue? In the next section, I’ll tackle too much sleep, as well as some recommendations when waking your dog up.

Dog In Deep Sleep, Hard to Wake Up

Dogs enter such deep sleep cycles in a short amount of time, so it’s normal to expect that they find it difficult to wake up. However, too much sleep, including deep sleep, can pose a problem especially when you have to take a few minutes until they’re fully awake.

You’ll know if your dog is having too much sleep and that it’s serious if:

  • They sleep a lot more than normal and they still seem to lack energy while awake
  • They have breathing issues while sleeping
  • There are other changes in their normal activity other than more sleep, including bathroom or eating habits
  • They have been sleeping way more for a long period of time and it’s remained persistent

There are various causes as to why your dog is in very deep sleep more so than usual, such as:

  • Change of routine such as moving homes or changing work hours
  • Depression, which causes lethargy and withdrawal
  • Dehydration or malnutrition, which affects energy levels
  • Hypothyroidism which leads to sluggishness and other symptoms because of lack of necessary hormones
  • Different health problems which cause excessive sleepiness such as diabetes, Lyme disease, or parvovirus

This isn’t supposed to scare you, but to inform you that your dog’s deep sleep should be closely monitored, especially if it’s come to a point that they sleep most of the day and can’t wake up easily.

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Should You Wake Your Dog Up?

People have complained about not being able to wake their dog up quickly when they sleep. However, should you be waking up is the question.

Many experts advise that you DON’T wake your dog up while he’s in deep sleep. While it’s not necessarily a dangerous thing to do, no one wants their sleep disturbed! As long as your dog is sleeping fine and doesn’t show any signs of sleep disorders like REM Behavior Disorder or Sleep Apnea, then allow them to get some rest.

If you do see that they are experiencing different symptoms along with excessive sleep, then it’s best to consult their vet.

If you want to learn more about the different sleep disorders in dogs, here’s an informative video to get you started:

Wrapping It Up

All animals, including dogs, need proper sleep for good physical and mental health. However, too deep of sleep can mean other things, so it’s best that you have it checked in case you also notice other symptoms. That way, your pet can sleep peacefully without finding it difficult to wake up when it’s time for their walk.

I hope that this article helped you remedy your dog in deep sleep, hard to wake up. So start learning even more about your dog and how to improve their overall health now!

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